Jan 29 2016

Comment by Seth Spearman on What is the RTF syntax for a hyperlink?

For the record, on Windows machines you can open WordPad and create a document with any formatting you want in it. Then save it. Close it in wordpad and open it in your favorite text editor. Unlike word, wordpad produces clean RTF.
Jan 29 2016

Comment by Seth Spearman on What is the RTF syntax for a hyperlink?

For the record, on Windows machines you can open WordPad and create a document with any formatting you want in it. Then save it. Close it in wordpad and open it in your favorite text editor. Unlike word, wordpad produces clean RTF.
Jan 08 2016

Writing store local and sync remote applications with .NET

Found this…

Depending on how much “Control” you want to have within your sync, it might be best to use an existing framework that already handles this for you. Some great suggestions would be:

Microsoft Sync Framework – http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sync/bb736753.aspx

Azure Mobile Services (Offline Sync) – Great video of what is coming soon/in preview: http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2014/3-623

iFacr – http://ifactr.com/platform/data-sync-engine

Bidirectional syncs can be quite tough to make and manage, and in my opinion it’s better to let some of these frameworks handle the heavy lifting for you. Azure Mobile Services have some great things on the horizon that are really fun to play with. You can get a small introduction from a blog post I wrote here: http://www.jon-douglas.com/2014/04/to-the-cloud/

I personally prefer having the control on my backend(Web API), and thus I create a ASP.NET Web API for my Azure Mobile Service, and let the data structures that Azure Mobile Services provide to obtain my bidirectional sync. In that video I linked above, he somewhat goes over how that is accomplished and how it works when a device is offline.

 

Found here…

http://forums.xamarin.com/discussion/15900/data-sync-from-sql-db-to-the-application-local-storage